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From well-preserved shipwrecks to thriving kelp forests and iconic tectonic divides, cold water scuba diving offers some of the most amazing sites you’ll ever experience.

Not to mention a lack of crowds.

But…

Without proper exposure protection, you’re going to seriously struggle.

And that’s where a drysuit comes in.

AT A GLANCE: OUR TOP PICKS FOR BEST DRYSUITS

Not only will a drysuit prevent hypothermia. But the right drysuit will also tremendously increase the enjoyment of your dives, lengthen your diving season and open up new diving locations.

Whether you’re ready to buy your first drysuit or you just want to learn more about the best drysuits for scuba diving you’ve come to the right place.

QUICK COMPARISON
Fourth Element Argonaut Flex 2.0
  • Bio-mapping custom fit available
  • Great for cave and wreck diving
  • Extremely tear-resistant
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SEAC Warmdry 4mm
  • Excellent thermal protection
  • Great value for money
  • Sturdy pocket
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ScubaPro Exodry Drysuit
  • Stylish & form-fitting design
  • Great value for money
  • Wide range of sizes
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AquaLung Fusion Bullet Drysuit
  • Dual-layer design keeps you warm underwater but cool on land
  • Incredibly comfortable
  • Highly flexible
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AQUALUNG Womens Blizzard Pro Drysuit
  • Premium compressed Yamamoto neoprene
  • SLT technology for the wrist seals
  • ultra-reflective safety tape
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BARE X-Mission Evolution
  • Anatomically cut for comfort
  • Extremely light (3.4kg)
  • Men's and women's sizes
View Latest Price

Want to learn more about these options?

Best Drysuits For Scuba Diving

  • Material: Flex trilaminate, kevlar reinforced
  • Seals: Neoprene or silicone
  • Hood: Yes
  • Pockets: 2
  • Zip: Front
  • Boots or Socks: Neoprene socks with dry boot option

Fourth Element is easily one of the biggest brands in diving, and the quality of their products speaks for itself.

The Fourth Element Argonaut Flex 2.0 is one of the best drysuits on the market. The impressive design and Bio-mapping custom-fit service make this one of the most comfortable drysuits available.

The Flex-Trilaminate material is thick, rugged, and durable without sacrificing your range of movement.

If you’re looking for a drysuit that delivers what’s promised, then look no further than the Fourth Element Flex 2.0.

What we love

  • Great for extreme, and mild conditions
  • Duratex panels
  • Two tech pockets
  • Front entry
  • Apeks inlet and exhaust valves

Downsides

  • Due to Bio-map service can take around 12 weeks to make. Does mean you get a custom fit though

With Worldwide Shipping

  • Material: Neoprene
  • Seals: Neoprene
  • Hood: Yes
  • Pockets: 1
  • Zip: Rear
  • Boots or Socks: Integrated boots

The SEAC Warmdry is an ideal first drysuit for any recreational diver who’s ready to commit to diving in colder waters.

A low profile design creates a beautifully streamlined drysuit that’s flexible and comfortable. Made from high-density neoprene, the SEAC Warmdry drysuit provides exceptional thermal insulation without becoming heavy or bulky. The semi-flexible boots allow your feet to move easily and can be turned inside-out for quick drying.

If you’re looking for a great budget drysuit that’s easy to use and provides exceptional warmth, then the SEAC Warmdry 4mm is the best option for you.

What we love

  • Excellent thermal protection
  • Great value for money
  • Sturdy pocket
  • Comfortable seals
  • Flexible & lightweight

Downsides

  • Boots don’t provide much grip
  • Sizes come up a little small

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  • Material: Neoprene
  • Seals: Latex
  • Hood: Yes
  • Pockets: 1
  • Zip: Rear
  • Boots or Socks: Integrated boots

Designed specifically for women, this ScubaPro ExoDry is stylish and form-fitting. Despite its sleek design, ScubaPro has not compromised on comfort or functionality.

Made from high-density neoprene, this drysuit resists compression which means you’ll have minimal buoyancy change and excellent insulation, even at depth. The heavy-duty latex cuff and neck seals provide a reliable, water-tight fit.

With sturdy, integrated boots and a thick neoprene hood, the ScubaPro Exodry will protect you against all the elements, both in and out of the water. Depending on the water temperatures, this drysuit still provides reasonable warmth without undergarments.

If you’re a female diver looking for a great value and comfortable drysuit, then the ScubaPro ExoDry is a solid choice.

What we love

  • Stylish & form-fitting design
  • Great value for money
  • Wide range of sizes
  • Compression resistant
  • Good thermal insulation

Downsides

  • No tall sizes available

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  • Material: Neoprene
  • Seals: Neoprene
  • Hood: Yes
  • Pockets: 2
  • Zip: Rear
  • Boots or Socks: Integrated boots

Loaded with innovative features at a reasonable price, the AquaLung Fusion Bullet is our best overall drysuit.

The AquaLung Fusion Bullet drysuit combines AquaLung’s patented breathable AirCore lining with a high-stretch neoprene shell. This innovative dual-layer design means that this drysuit is super warm underwater, but remains comfortably cool on land. Even in hot air temperatures. Which is something that no other drysuit can offer.

The semicircular zipper makes this dry suit easy to get in and out of, even if you’re by yourself. And the expandable cargo pockets remain functional without causing much impact to your trim.

What’s more, the ergonomic design of the dual layers ensures that this drysuit remains perfectly streamlined with almost no restriction of movement.

And if that’s not enough, the outer layer of this drysuit can be purchased separately and easily changed. This means that you can replace the outer shell without having to buy a whole new drysuit.

Although this drysuit has been reinforced for maximum durability so it’s unlikely you’ll need to!

Versatile, comfortable, and hard-wearing, you simply can’t go wrong with the AquaLung Fusion Bullet drysuit.

What we love

  • Dual-layer design keeps you warm underwater but cool on land
  • Incredibly comfortable
  • Highly flexible
  • Streamlined pockets
  • Durable & longlasting
  • Easy to take on & off

Downsides

  • Lots of zips & velcro due to it’s dual-layer design

Free US Shipping Over $50

With Worldwide Shipping

  • Material: Neoprene
  • Seals: SLT technology
  • Hood: Yes
  • Pockets: 1
  • Zip: Back
  • Boots or Socks: Integrated socks with dry boot option

The Blizzard Pro has an excellent range of movement and flexibility, which makes it one of the most comfortable and easy to put on drysuits available.

The drysuit is outfitted with a neoprene neck seal and replaceable silicone wrist seals, which gives the drysuit and very comfortable, yet effective feel with its impressive buoyancy control and harness features.

What we love

  • Super comfortable
  • Easy to put on and take off
  • SLT technology and Yamamoto neoprene
  • Ultra-reflective safety strips

Downsides

  • Can bulge slightly in the shoulders
  • Quite expensive

With Worldwide Shipping

  • Material: Nylon Trilaminate
  • Seals: Nylon
  • Hood: No
  • Pockets: 2
  • Zip: Front
  • Boots or Socks: Neoprene socks with dry boot option

Bare’s X-Mission Evolution is designed with the advanced tech diver in mind.

Its trim has been cut to deal with advanced cave dives and is hardy enough for the tightest penetrations.

Although it’s been designed toward tech divers, the X-Mission performs well as a recreational drysuit.

What we love

  • Designed by a cave diving team
  • Highly durable material
  • Anatomically cut for comfort
  • Two sturdy tech pockets on the thigh
  • Excellent low-profile Apeks valves
  • Women's and men's sizes available

Downsides

  • Very expensive

With Worldwide Shipping

Free US Shipping Over $50

How to choose the best drysuit

Drysuits are not the cheapest piece of scuba diving gear. So it’s important to consider a few things before buying your own.

Best Drysuit Material

Recreational drysuits come in 2 main materials; neoprene or membrane. Which drysuit material you choose depends on your personal preference and the type of diving you plan on doing.

Membrane drysuits

Optimized selec 2 1

Membrane drysuits (also referred to as trilaminate, laminate, and shell suits) are made up of 3 or more layers of fabric which make them waterproof.

Membrane drysuits are very robust but they don’t offer any thermal protection. So it’s important you buy enough undergarments to keep you warm underwater.

They generally have a looser fit than neoprene drysuits so you can add more insulation underneath.

If you will be diving in varying degrees of cold water then a membrane suit offers you more flexibility to adjust your undergarments to different temperatures.

What’s more, because membrane drysuits are thin they’re super lightweight which makes them ideal for traveling. Plus they’re easy to clean and quick to dry.

Neoprene drysuits

Best drysuit for women scubapro exodry

As the name suggests, neoprene drysuits are made from neoprene, just like a wetsuit.

However, unlike a wetsuit, a neoprene drysuit will have a lining on the inside and outside which makes them fully waterproof.

Neoprene wetsuits are significantly thicker and warmer than membrane drysuits, which means you need fewer undergarments to stay warm.

Neoprene drysuits are also more form-fitting and flexible which many divers find more comfortable.

However, due to their thickness neoprene drysuits are much heavier and bulkier. They’re also easier to puncture than a membrane drysuit.

Plus the bubbles in the neoprene will have an effect on your buoyancy when diving deeper.

More expensive neoprene drysuits will undergo a process of crushing or compression to make them thinner and more durable.

A compressed or crushed neoprene drysuit is even more flexible and has less effect on your buoyancy as the bubbles are also compressed.

Best Drysuit Seals

Best drysuit seal

The seals are arguably the most important part of your drysuit.

Typically you will have 3 seals on your drysuit; one at the neck and two at the wrists.

But there may also be seals around the ankles. Or around the face, if the drysuit features a fully integrated hood.

Drysuits seals come in 3 different types; latex, silicone, and neoprene.

No drysuit seal will last forever but each type has its pros and cons. So let’s take a look…

Latex

Latex drysuit seals are effective, affordable, and very flexible. However, they can feel tight and they’re more liable to tear.

Latex seals will also stretch and degrade over time. Plus they’re no good if you’re allergic to latex!

Silicone

Silicone seals are a great alternative for a membrane suit if you’re allergic to latex. They’re incredibly comfortable, provide an excellent seal, and are easy to change. But silicone seals are quite fragile and require a ring system to be attached to the suit.

Neoprene

Neoprene seals are the toughest and provide even pressure against your body. However, they’re not as effective or stretchy as the other seals. You may need to fold a neoprene seal to make it fully watertight.

Best Drysuit Zips

Drysuits can have front entry zips, U or back zips, and shoulder zips. The location of the drysuit zip is down to personal preference and whatever you find easiest.

A front zip is easier to close by yourself but a back zip gives a more streamlined look.

You can also add a P-valve to most drysuits, aka a pee zip, for an additional cost.

Drysuit Socks or Boots

Once you’ve decided what material you want your drysuit to be made of, it’s time to think about your feet. Drysuits will either come with built-in socks or boots.

Built-in Drysuit Socks

Drysuit sock

Some drysuits will end in a thin neoprene sock.

Although waterproof, these socks are not thick enough to protect your toes from the cold. Nor sturdy enough to protect your feet from rough ground.

With this style of drysuit, you will need to wear rock boots. Rock boots come in a variety of styles and sturdiness to suit the environment you’re diving in.

Rock boots are easy to repair and replace. Plus they have a tighter, more custom fit which makes your finning much more efficient.

However, they’re heavy to travel with and are an additional cost on top of buying the drysuit. You may also need to go up a size in your fins to accommodate your rock boots.

Bare Force 1 Drysuit boots scuba diving

If you’re looking for a reliable pair of rock boots, we recommend the Bare Force 1 rugged drysuit boots.

With their heavy-duty sole, easy lacing, and superior fin strap stability these are a great drysuit boot for all environments.

Built-in Drysuit Boots

Integrated drysuit bootsThe majority of drysuits come with built-in boots. The leg of the drysuit simply ends with a boot.

These built-in boots will be made from the same material as the drysuit and will feature some sort of sole for grip.

Built-in boots are easier to put on, lighter to travel with, and significantly more affordable than rock boots.

However, they usually don’t fit as well and are harder to replace.

Frequently Asked Questions

A good drysuit for scuba diving is a worthwhile investment if you’re frequently diving in colder water. There’s really is nothing that takes the joy out of diving faster than being freezing cold.

And when looked after properly, these drysuits are sure to keep you warm and toasty for several years to come.

So now you know all of the best drysuits for scuba diving it’s time to make your choice!

Which drysuit did you pick? Have you tried diving in your drysuit yet?

Let us know your experience below.

Looking for other dive accessories to go with your new drysuit?

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Alexa Worswick Administrator

Alexa Worswick is a PADI + SSI scuba instructor, experienced freediver, and travel writer. With over 15 years of scuba diving experience in many locations across 3 different continents, she’s now based in Indonesia.

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